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  • mmol/l to mg/l

    hello everyone

    is there any conversion factor to convert mmol/l to mg/l?
    how does one prepare mmol/l of any solution, say lead nitrate??

    cheers
    p

  • #2
    Re: mmol/l to mg/l

    Here is a chart with various factors:
    http://www.vin.com/scripts/labquest/converthtml.pl

    There is a technical explantion of the process here:
    http://faculty.plattsburgh.edu/rober...ions/index.htm

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: mmol/l to mg/l

      thanks a ton

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: mmol/l to mg/l

        Originally posted by forconversion20
        hello everyone

        is there any conversion factor to convert mmol/l to mg/l?
        how does one prepare mmol/l of any solution, say lead nitrate??

        cheers
        p
        To convert mmol/l to mg/l
        Multiply mmol/l with 18 you will get mg/l.

        Regards
        Zubair

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: mmol/l to mg/l

          Why 18??? I need to do pretty much teh same conversion going from mol/L to mg/L and i cant for the life of me remember how to do it

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: mmol/l to mg/l

            A mole, or mol of something is the weight of a precise number of atoms or molecules, called Avagadro's number. This is the atomic or molecular weight.

            1 mol of lead nitrate is the weight in grams of 6.0221415 10 molecules.

            It will be a LOT more than 18.
            18g is the weight of 1 mol of water (H2O).

            A 1mol/L (1M or 1molar) solution has 6.0221415 x 10 molecules per litre, and is in g/L
            A 1mmol/L (1millimolar) solution is 1000 times more dilute, and there are 1000mg in 1g.

            So to go from mmol/L to mg/L, multiply by the molecular weight.

            To go from mg/L to mmol/L divide by the molecular weight.

            Lead is poisonous, particularly in solution. If you are really dealing with these solutions, is it possible to get the help of someone who is trained in the use of chemical poisons?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: mmol/l to mg/l

              dOes anyOne knOw how to convert mg/L to mol/L??

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                Originally posted by Unregistered
                Why 18??? I need to do pretty much teh same conversion going from mol/L to mg/L and i cant for the life of me remember how to do it
                I need conversion form mmol/L to mg/L and explanation of how to come about that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                  Originally posted by Unregistered
                  I need conversion form mmol/L to mg/L and explanation of how to come about that.
                  Hi, If post #6 doesn't answer your question, please can you provide information about what you are trying to do, exactly?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                    Regarding the number '18' in this forum.
                    It appears in much literature surrounding the conversion of mmol/L - especially for blood glucose.

                    I found a diabetes article today that uses the number 18 as a conversion tool, on a UK diabetic website. I was trying to find a simple explanation for mmol/L for a student nurse whom I am mentoring just now. As usual I have become totally side tracked.

                    I would find it interesting to discover where the '18' originates - can investigate 'links' myself, if any available. Thank you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                      Originally posted by dorianjane
                      Regarding the number '18' in this forum.
                      It appears in much literature surrounding the conversion of mmol/L - especially for blood glucose.

                      I found a diabetes article today that uses the number 18 as a conversion tool, on a UK diabetic website. I was trying to find a simple explanation for mmol/L for a student nurse whom I am mentoring just now. As usual I have become totally side tracked.

                      I would find it interesting to discover where the '18' originates - can investigate 'links' myself, if any available. Thank you.
                      The proper molar mass for glucose is 180 g/mol. However, the units commonly used are mg/dL and mmol/L. The factor of 18 is the product of 180 used to convert between grams and moles, and 0.1 to convert between liters and dekaliters. It saves a step at the risk of making the conversion process very confusing.

                      For anything, establish the chemical formula. Use a periodic table (or other reference of atomic weights) to add up the atomic weights of all the atoms that make of the molecule for which a molar mas is desired. A number of grams equal to this atomic weight is the molar mass for converting between grams and moles.

                      This Wikipedia article is a good starting point for additional info on molar mass: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molar_mass
                      Last edited by JohnS; 05-22-2008, 05:08 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                        18 is for the conversion of blood glucose. for the cholesterol you should multiply the mmol by 39 and you will get the mg/dl.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                          Geez- please pay close attention to the fact that there are no fixed 'conversion factors' between these sets of units. Understand their *meaning* and your basic (as in 6th grade) chemistry and math.

                          It is frightening anyone in the health and medical professions should be this clueless. Much less anyone mixing toxic solutions.

                          Thanks to those replying with correct guidance (check the wikipedia suggestion, as bare minimum starting point).

                          To the rest carelessly tossing out numbers randomly, completely missing the fact that you have been using the mass of a specific element or molecule rather than a conversion factor: you are dangerous to the health and safety of others. You are unqualified to be working with chemicals, much less advising others.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                            Originally posted by Unregistered
                            Geez- please pay close attention to the fact that there are no fixed 'conversion factors' between these sets of units. Understand their *meaning* and your basic (as in 6th grade) chemistry and math.

                            It is frightening anyone in the health and medical professions should be this clueless. Much less anyone mixing toxic solutions.

                            Thanks to those replying with correct guidance (check the wikipedia suggestion, as bare minimum starting point).

                            To the rest carelessly tossing out numbers randomly, completely missing the fact that you have been using the mass of a specific element or molecule rather than a conversion factor: you are dangerous to the health and safety of others. You are unqualified to be working with chemicals, much less advising others.
                            Every student has to start somewhere, and not all tutors are that approachable or helpful. Most people who ask medical questions on here are just either checking their working, or are patients trying to understand what their blood tests mean. Sometimes students just need help understanding what a question is asking in the first place. You are welcome to register and join in and answer questions nicely.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: mmol/l to mg/l

                              ALDOSTERONE:

                              What is conversion factor mmol/L to ng/dL for ALDOSTERONE. Thanks.

                              Comment

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