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  • mg/dL to ng/L converssion

    Hi,
    I have two questions.

    Can somebody help me convert 3.3mg/dL to ng/L?

    Also, how do i convert 1.42 pg/ml into mg/L

    For the life of me, I can't work these two out.

    Thanks,

    Kostas

  • #2
    Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

    Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
    Hi,
    I have two questions.

    Can somebody help me convert 3.3mg/dL to ng/L?

    Also, how do i convert 1.42 pg/ml into mg/L

    For the life of me, I can't work these two out.

    Thanks,

    Kostas
    You have to know where the various metric prefixes mean, and their symbols:
    m = 0.001
    d = 0.1
    p = 10^-12
    n = 10^-9

    3.3 mg/dL = 33 mg/L, and 33 000 000 ng/L seems like a clumsy way to express it.

    1.42 pg/mL = 1.42 ng/L. Again 0.000 001 42 mg/L seems clumsy.

    I'm pretty sure these are homework and the problem requirements are stupid, as the prefix should normally be chosen so the numeric value lie between 1 - 1000. Exceptions are allowed in tables, so all units are the same, and some other cases, but the required forms make the result "opaque." No sensible person who understands metric would choose the chosen units.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

      Can anyone help me? I am trying to figure out how to convert 2187ng/ml to mg/dl... if I have 15mg, would that equal 2187ng?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

        Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
        Can anyone help me? I am trying to figure out how to convert 2187ng/ml to mg/dl... if I have 15mg, would that equal 2187ng?
        2187 ng/mL x 1 mg/10^6 ng x 100 mL/1 dL = 0.2187 mg/dL

        Conversions within the metric system are just powers of ten (decimal shifting) based on the prefixes.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

          Howdy,
          I am actually compiling a table for a systematic review that I am working on.

          The ng/L measure is what the majority of the studies (with the exception of 1 study which reported in mg/dL) used to measure interleukin-6 concentration.

          Similarly, C-reactive protein has mainly been reported in mg/L but one study has reported in pg/ml.

          Thanks for your help.

          Kostas

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

            Hi John,
            With the above in mind, am i incorrect in mentally converting 24.4 pg/ml of IL-6 as being the same as 24.4 ng/L??

            The way I see it,
            p=10(power)-12 & m=10(power)-3
            n= 10(power)-9 & L=10(power)3.

            I think i have missed something there. If the above is correct, then this value would be up to 10-fold higher than the values of other studies. This would be enough to alter my meta-analysis markedly.

            Kostas

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: mg/dL to ng/L converssion

              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
              Hi John,
              With the above in mind, am i incorrect in mentally converting 24.4 pg/ml of IL-6 as being the same as 24.4 ng/L??

              The way I see it,
              p=10(power)-12 & m=10(power)-3
              n= 10(power)-9 & L=10(power)3.

              I think i have missed something there. If the above is correct, then this value would be up to 10-fold higher than the values of other studies. This would be enough to alter my meta-analysis markedly.

              Kostas
              That is exactly correct and a very handy property. Just make sure that your prefix steps involve equal powers of ten in both numerator and denominator.

              Be careful of the deciliter, frequently used in American publications it is 100 mL or 0.1 L. Verify that you are moving the same power of ten, not the same number of prefixes (similarly beware of centi, deka and hecto. They occur in steps of ten, not 1000). Unexpected factors of 10 or 100 are almost always issues with the deciliter.

              Comment

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