Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Volume of Air Under Pressure

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Volume of Air Under Pressure

    I have a 1000Lt Compressed Air Receiver at 8Bar. How many liters of air is contained within the vessel.

    Please may someone help me with a formula for this as I have different size vessels at different pressure to work out.

    Thanks

    please include units in your reply- i.e. Bar, Liters, etc.
    Last edited by Crayber; 11-15-2011, 05:28 PM. Reason: additional info

  • #2
    Re: Volume of Air Under Pressure

    Here's a start
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ideal_gas_law

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Volume of Air Under Pressure

      Thank You HerrWarum

      Unfortunately the page you sent me to is very complicated to the untrained eye.

      Does anybody know of a simplified version. I only need to know the volume (in liters or cubic meters) of air stored in a 1000Lt Air Vessel which is pressurized to 8Bar.

      my end result is the time it takes to release that volume of air if released at 370Lt/min.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Volume of Air Under Pressure

        Assuming it is being released at the same temperature it is stored at, you have a 1000L vessel at 8 Bar. You will eventually end up with 1000L left at 1.01 bar. (call it 1 bar).

        Assuming you can control the release rate fairly precisely, you want to know how much time it takes to get from 8bar to 1 bar.

        Probably the easiest way of understanding this for your future reference is to ask yourself "If all my air was originally at 1 bar, how many 1000L containers would this occupy?" - As air pressure is almost directly proportional to content, the answer is about 8 1000L cylinders. (8000L)

        So your question is really, how long will it take to use up 7000L at the rate of 370L/min?

        7000/370 = about 18 or 19 minutes.


        * this only applies to gases that obey the ideal gas law, air more or less does, as long as it is fairly dry.

        Comment

        Working...
        X