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  • from PPM to mg/dNm3

    Hi all,

    Please assist in converting PPM SO2 gas into mg/dNm3.

    Thanks very much.

  • #2
    Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

    Originally posted by Roman Katz View Post
    Hi all,

    Please assist in converting PPM SO2 gas into mg/dNm3.

    Thanks very much.
    Assuming the "d" is for dry, how wet is your gas mixture? You first have to correct it for removal of all moisture.

    Then ppm is micromoles of pollutant per mole of mixture. In the numerator, multiply by the molecular weight to get grams of pollutant. In the denominator, multiply by 22.4 L/mole (0.0224 m/mol) to get volume.

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    • #3
      Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

      Lets assume a general number( one of your choice), I am not sure at this point. What would the formula be?

      I am also interested in the Normalization value. I am not sure that I have to adapt the math, since the change is limited.

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      • #4
        Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

        Originally posted by Roman Katz View Post
        Lets assume a general number( one of your choice), I am not sure at this point. What would the formula be?

        I am also interested in the Normalization value. I am not sure that I have to adapt the math, since the change is limited.
        Would you be able to post your own values? Then we can see what units you are working in and go from there.

        You need:
        ppm SO2
        ppm H2O
        Temperature of system
        Pressure of system

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        • #5
          Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

          250 PPM SO2

          15% humidity

          180 deg C, gas temp

          Pressure- 470 mmWC (water column)

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

            15% of the gas is H2O? - Won't all your SO2 be present as sulphuric acid?

            Also, the normal values are variable, but are around zeroC - room temperature and at atmospheric pressure, not at high temperature, and under vacuum.

            Here is a discussion of them: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/st...air-d_772.html

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            • #7
              Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

              This is a review of the main scrubbing processes for SO2 from wet or dry systems - Not my field, but this article seems quite comprehensive:
              http://plainsjustice.org/files/ElkRu...0emissions.pdf

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              • #8
                Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                Thanks for the article.

                SO2 may be converted into the acid and removed. In our case it is transformed into fertilizer.

                Please assist in the calculation method.

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                • #9
                  Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                  Originally posted by Roman Katz View Post
                  250 PPM SO2

                  15% humidity

                  180 deg C, gas temp

                  Pressure- 470 mmWC (water column)
                  Lets assume 250ppm SO2, 150000ppm H2O, 453.15K, 4.413kPa, with normal conditions being 0ppm H2O, 273.15K, and 101.325kPa. Lets also assume ppm for these systems is L/L.

                  PPM SO2 at Normal temp and Pressure:

                  250 x 1.15 x 453.15/273.15 x 101.325/4.413 = 10,951 ppm.

                  You multiply by 1.15 to allow for a dry system.
                  You multiply by 453.15/273.15 to allow for the drop in temperature.
                  You multiply by 101.325/4.413 to allow for the increase in pressure.


                  This is how to do the calculation you are asking about, which is just an accademic exercise. In reality, neither SO2 or H2O obey the ideal gas law, so the method doesn't work, and the real values need to be measured. SO2 is highly toxic, and you have a lot of it.

                  Edit:

                  Sorry, i used 450mm water column, not 470.

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                  • #10
                    Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                    Thanks very much!!!

                    I will share the exact numbers as soon as I'll have them.

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                    • #11
                      Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                      Here are the exact values:

                      Gas temp, 150 deg C
                      humidity 30-45%
                      SO2: 2000PPM
                      O2 during measurements: 10.7%

                      What would the calculation be?

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                      • #12
                        Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                        Here are the measured values:

                        Pressured drop: 75 mm/WC
                        Flue gas temp: 150 deg C
                        gas humidity 30%
                        O2-10% during measurement.
                        SO2: 2000PPM

                        What would the calculation be?

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                        • #13
                          Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                          For numerous reasons, i don't think you should be involved in this. Seriously. That is THE best advise anyone can give you.

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                          • #14
                            Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                            What do you mean?

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                            • #15
                              Re: from PPM to mg/dNm3

                              I'm not sure if this is a real situation, or how you are involved, or how much exhaust is involved. (These are usually processes from large production plants such as refineries or smelters though). If this is a real situation, you could consider employing a consultant who can help you with the clean-up, if that is what you are requiring.

                              I can only go by what you have written here, and may be reading it completely wrong. However, from what i read, you have completely missed the danger of the situation, both for personnel and the environment, even though it has been pointed out. - Large amounts of SO2 - which is highly toxic, and is one of the main contributors to acid rain. You don't appreciate the constraints of the system, also pointed out - potentially lots of sulphuric acid produced - which changes the calculations hugely, is highly corrosive, and has caused many industrial accidents and deaths.

                              Most countries have rigorous standards to avoid environmental contamination form these systems. Having someone who understands these standards is imperative.

                              What comes across from what you have said or not said is that you don't have the background, training, or thought processes to take heed of the ethical and scientific considerations, therefore i do not think you should be further involved in this work.

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