Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

propane to btu

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • propane to btu

    150 scfh to btu

  • #2
    Re: propane to btu

    Those are both different types of units. Can you provide more information as to what you are trying to do?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: propane to btu

      Originally posted by Robert Fogt
      Those are both different types of units. Can you provide more information as to what you are trying to do?
      how much propane will a turkey fryer use per hour?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: propane to btu

        Here is a very useful site about propane:



        http://www.propane.ca/Resources/propane.asp

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: propane to btu

          Originally posted by Robert Fogt
          Those are both different types of units. Can you provide more information as to what you are trying to do?
          how many btu's are provided by one gallon of propane

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: propane to btu

            If I have a tiki torch that burns 18585 BTU's per hour, how do I convert that to gallons per hour?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: propane to btu

              Propane is usually measured in pounds. You get 21622 btu per pound.
              So a 20 pound bottle will net you 432440 btu. So just find out what the
              usage of your product is and the amount of your supply.

              Hope this helps.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: propane to btu

                Back to the original question,
                According to my chart on approximate properties of LP-gas (commercial propane)

                1 gal. of liquid propane at 60 degrees F weighs 4.20 lb.

                The latent heat needed of vaporization is 184 Btu / lb or 773 Btu / gal.
                That is how much heat the tank will absorb to convert the liquid to a vapor. This is ignored if the tank is outside and the heat comes from the outside air. Only if the tank is heated by the propane like if the tank is inside and you are using a space heater in the garage is it a factor. Then it is only 0.8 percent.

                The total heat after vaporization:
                1 standard cubic foot vapor has 2,488 Btu (0 psig or at atmospheric pressure)
                1 lb has 21,548 Btu
                1 gal has 91,502 Btu
                A 20lb gas grill tank filled to 18lb like most of them are holds 18lb/4.2lb per gal=4.28gal.

                scfh stands for standard cubic feet per hour

                So, 150 scfh (propane) would be 150scfh*2,844Btu/cf=426,600 Btu/hour.

                So your turkey roaster would use up to 426,600 Btu/hour or 426,600Btu/hour dived by 91,502 Btu/gal would be 4.66gal/hr.

                That's a BIG turkey roaster. Mine has a max. output of 150,000Btu/hour and that is with it turned all the way up.

                Don

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: propane to btu

                  I using the above to make sure my assumptions are correct.

                  I took the amount 21622 btu per a pound and calculated that at 18 pounds in a 20lb gas grill tank. An my heater on low will burn 6000 btu I assume per an hour. Then 21622 x 18 = 389196.
                  and 389196 / 6000 = 64.866.
                  So my assumption is that the heater will run for 64.866 hours on the
                  6000 but setting.
                  I this right?
                  I plan to get another backup tank and if the heat ever goes out I can survive for a while.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: propane to btu

                    how many BTUs are in a cubic ft of LP gas? If a pilot light uses 1200 BTUs an hour, how many cubic ft of propane will it use in a month? I'm trying to calculate the cost of having a propane gas fireplace in Florida when we will only use the pilot for 8 months and the fireplace maybe 20 hours a month in the remaining four months as a decoration, not for heat.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: propane to btu

                      Originally posted by Snowden
                      how many BTUs are in a cubic ft of LP gas? If a pilot light uses 1200 BTUs an hour, how many cubic ft of propane will it use in a month? I'm trying to calculate the cost of having a propane gas fireplace in Florida when we will only use the pilot for 8 months and the fireplace maybe 20 hours a month in the remaining four months as a decoration, not for heat.
                      2520 BTU/scf, so you will use a little less than 0.5 scf/hour, about 360 scf/month.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: propane to btu

                        want to know the useble heat value of propane, as compared to natural gas, gasoline, deisel fuel etc

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: propane to btu

                          At 6,200 feet altitude, how many BTU/HR will one gallon (or one cubic foot) of propane produce as input to my propane furnace.

                          The furnace has a 46,000 BTU/HR input rating.

                          Thank you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: propane to btu

                            Originally posted by Unregistered
                            At 6,200 feet altitude, how many BTU/HR will one gallon (or one cubic foot) of propane produce as input to my propane furnace.

                            The furnace has a 46,000 BTU/HR input rating.

                            Thank you.
                            Altitude may require some burner adjustment for air/fuel ratio, but it doesn't affect the heat content of the propane. A gallon of pressurized liquid prpane is 91400 BTU. The thermostat will turn it on and off, but if on continuously, it would burn about 0.5 gallon per hour.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: propane to btu

                              A pilot light doesn't use anything like 1200 BTU/H. It would cost about 2-1/2 cents per hour, and use a gallon of fuel in 3 days.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X