Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Conversion of Amps to BTU

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Conversion of Amps to BTU

    I am in need to figure out how to convert amps to btu's. All help is appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

    I do not see any direct conversion between them.

    Can you provide more information as to exactly what you are trying to do?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

      We are currently trying to figure out total BTU values in our Server room so we can have a total BTU value to know if we need to upgrade and the our Security camera equipment only gives us values in Amps and not BTU's. I am unable to convert amps to BTUs and would like to find a way to convert amps to BTU's.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

        Btu is a unit of energy not power, not sure why you would need Btu values. Usually things like backup power supplies are rated in Watts or kilowatts.

        But here is how you would do it.

        Amps * Volts = Watts
        Watts * hours = watthours
        watthours * 3.41214148 = Btu

        So you would need to know amps, volts (usually 120 or 240), and the number of hours.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

          I'm trying to figure out what the BTU rating is on equipment so I can calculate the amount of air conditioning needed for the equipment room.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

            Dell has an online calculator for that type of thing here:

            http://www.dell.com/calc/

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

              Originally posted by Unregistered
              I am in need to figure out how to convert amps to btu's. All help is appreciated.
              66.8 amps
              138.6

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                Originally posted by Unregistered
                I am in need to figure out how to convert amps to btu's. All help is appreciated.
                looking for btu to amp conversion table

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                  IF anybody still needs this.... I have NOT verified accuracy, just found it at another website.

                  To determine the heat load of any electronic appliance, perform the following calculations:
                  Determine the voltage and amp rating of the power supply of the appliance. This information is usually located either in the appliance documentation or on the appliance itself near the power receptacle.

                  Multiply the voltage by the amperage to determine watts.
                  For example, a DSR4020 switch has a power supply rated for 110 volts at .5 amps (per the back panel data). Its wattage is 55.

                  Multiply the watts by 3.413 to get BTUs/hour.
                  For example, a DSR4020 switch produces 187.7 BTUs/hour, based on the values obtained in step 2.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                    how would u know the hours needed to figure a amps to btu conversion

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                      Volts * Amps = VoltAmps

                      You will need to multiply your Power Factor in there to figure out your Watts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                        Guys, your'e comparing apples to oranges...

                        The "watts" you are reading from any label on any electrical appliance is for energy (IE. Power... Electricity) CONSUMED by the appliance... Not how much "heat" it produces like a "1500 watt" space heater.

                        Yes, when it comes to HEATERS you can theorecticlly (sorry for the spelling) figure heat output from the wattage/amps of electricity it uses but that just gives you a ballpark because you have to figure the heater's loss (efficiency) converting electricty to resistance heat and non heat producing loads (IE. Circ. fans, etc.) figured into the specs on the plate.

                        When you look at the watts consumed by an electrical device in a server room only a small percentage of the "watts" end up (in most cases) as heat because the majority of the electricity "should" be used to do what ever the job is the device is designed to do.

                        Yes, there are calcs for IT people to figure the cooling needs for server rooms, I just don't know where they are.

                        Bottom line is you cannot turn watts consumed into BTUs to determine your cooling needs. It's much more complicated than that. Room size, Insulation, Heat generated by equipment and the list goes on to be able to accuratly figure the BTUs needed to keep the room cool.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                          Originally posted by Unregistered
                          Guys, your'e comparing apples to oranges...

                          The "watts" you are reading from any label on any electrical appliance is for energy (IE. Power... Electricity) CONSUMED by the appliance... Not how much "heat" it produces like a "1500 watt" space heater.
                          I do not agree with this. A very small amount of the electricity consumed in the room may leave the room in some other form of energy. Examples include:
                          *Shaft or mechanical power from a motor exitting the room
                          * Light or other EM waves exitting the room through a "window" transparent at the frequency.
                          *Eletrical power of signals leaving the room via wiring.

                          Everthing else will eventually be converted to waste heat with the room, including the initial air motion of air circulated by fans (unless if physically exits).

                          For a server, the power exitting is VERY small. Each kilowatt of power consumed will require 3412 BTU/h of additional cooling. The 1st law of thermo. assures all the energy can be accounted for, and the 2nd law ensures if it can't otherwise be accounted for, it will eventually degrade to waste heat. (Frankly, what leaves the room will turn to waste heat in another room. You may get some "use" out of it on the way downhill.)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                            You don't need to consider time with watts.

                            Amps * volts = watts
                            Watts * 3.4 = btu

                            This is a perfect scenario of course not taking into account ambient temp of room and perfect efficiency. Personally consider doubling your btu for cooling on this equation to be safe and allow small amount of room for growth.

                            Basically 20amps at 120v is 1 ton of cooling aka 12000 btu in real world

                            Actually 1 W is about 3.4 BTU per hour, so there is still a time element. Often the "per hour" is assumed but omitted in specs.

                            You do need more BTU/h just to cool the room, but this is a reliable estimate of the incremental cooling for incremental load in the room.
                            Last edited by JohnS; 08-03-2010, 03:03 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Conversion of Amps to BTU

                              i want to calculate BTU requirement in a house area is =10000ft/sq to increase inside temp from 15c to 32c

                              Comment

                              Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
                              Auto-Saved
                              x
                              Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
                              x
                              x

                              Please enter the six letters or digits that appear in the image below.

                              Registration Image Refresh Image
                              Working...
                              X