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  • Nm3/hr to m3/hr

    how do u convert 1 Nm3/hr of HCl to m3/hr?

    Does the conversion require any other parmaters like density,etc.?
    Is the conversion for 1Nm3/hr of HCl to m3/hr standard , i.e can i use the conversion rate for any other gases also?

  • #2
    Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

    The N stands for Normal, meaning standard temperature and pressure.

    At standard temperature and pressure, then Nm3/hr = m3/hr

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

      And What About Sn3/hr

      Comment


      • #4
        convert m3 in nm3

        we are want to covert (1m3)in nm3 at35cand pressure 18psi

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: convert m3 in nm3

          Originally posted by akhtar
          we are want to covert (1m3)in nm3 at35cand pressure 18psi

          Is the 18 psi absolute or gauge? I have assumed absolute below

          Since the same moles of gas are involed P1*V1/T1 = P2*V2/T2

          So, V1 = V2 *(P2/P1)*(T1/T2)
          Standard pressure 101/325 kPa is about 14.7 psi

          Assuming "as measured" is 1 m, 18 psi, 35 C, volume at normal is
          V1 = 1 m x 18 psi/14.7 psi * 273.15 K/(35 + 273.15 K) =
          1.0854 Nm

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

            Robert Fogt 05-06-2007 03:45 PM

            The N stands for Normal, meaning standard temperature and pressure.

            At standard temperature and pressure, then Nm3/hr = m3/hr
            In this case, what would be clasified as normal? From a pharmaceutical perspective, normal and standard are 2 totally different aspects of the same criteria.

            Regards

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

              Originally posted by Stabilitycore
              Robert Fogt 05-06-2007 03:45 PM

              The N stands for Normal, meaning standard temperature and pressure.

              At standard temperature and pressure, then Nm3/hr = m3/hr
              In this case, what would be clasified as normal? From a pharmaceutical perspective, normal and standard are 2 totally different aspects of the same criteria.

              Regards
              As regards gases, "normal" is always at 101.325 kPa and 0 C. "Standard" is mostly used with "english" units, eg standard cubic feet, and uses the same standard pressure. Unfortunately, different industries use different (non)standards, and the temperature could be 15 C, 60 F, 20 C, 25 C and possiblly others.

              By stating the volume at normal or standard conditions, it becomes a disuised form of molar or mass flow. At normal, a number of grams of gas equal to the molecular weight (1 mole) will occupy 22.414 L of volume). The factor is slightly different (by ideal gas laws) at the various (non)standard temperatures.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                how would you or what would 877 cfm be in psi of room temp air

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                • #9
                  Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                  Thanks for that answer! I presumed the N meant newtons and was very confused.

                  Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                    Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                    how do u convert 1 Nm3/hr of HCl to m3/hr?

                    Does the conversion require any other parmaters like density,etc.?
                    Is the conversion for 1Nm3/hr of HCl to m3/hr standard , i.e can i use the conversion rate for any other gases also?
                    how to calculate above value?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                      all wrong answers are quoted above.....normal is condition is at 20 deg C and standard is at 0 deg C and pressuere being 1 atm in both cases

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                        Originally posted by chemical View Post
                        all wrong answers are quoted above.....normal is condition is at 20 deg C and standard is at 0 deg C and pressuere being 1 atm in both cases
                        When I went to school, normal was 0 C and standard (used only with Imperial/Customary) was 60 F.

                        However, the present mess described by Wikipedia
                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standar...e_and_pressure
                        means that "normal" is defined as "abnormal"
                        and "standard" is defined as "non-standard"

                        The words are without meaning and you have to insist on the conditions being stated. If you assume, you will be wrong.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                          Originally posted by Robert Fogt View Post
                          The N stands for Normal, meaning standard temperature and pressure.

                          At standard temperature and pressure, then Nm3/hr = m3/hr
                          normal pressure=?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                            Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                            normal pressure=?
                            Traditionally, it has been 101.325 kPa, although there seems to be a trend towards describing material properties at 100 kPa.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Nm3/hr to m3/hr

                              Two things for you:
                              1. Conversion is easy. Apply P1v1/T1= P2V2/T2. now
                              2. NTP: Normal Temperature Pressure: 20deg C and 1 bar.
                              2. STP: Standard Temperature Pressure: 0deg C (273K) and 0 bar/vaccuum..
                              now you cannot use bars directly for the conversion and have to convert it to Kg/cm2 based on the pressure units.

                              Comment

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