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  • kg/m3 to KN/m3

    Can any one help me please.

    I know the mass of an object in m3 but have
    forgotten how to convert this to kn/m3.

    Any help will be greatfully recived.

    Thanks

    Dave.

  • #2
    Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

    1 kilogram-force is equal to 0.00980665 kilonewton

    kg-f/m * 0.00980665 = kN/m

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

      thanks, a great help

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

        Originally posted by Unregistered
        thanks, a great help
        kg/m3 to KN/m3

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

          So does 1KG of a material = 1kg of weight ???

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

            Originally posted by Unregistered
            So does 1KG of a material = 1kg of weight ???
            Not sure what you mean. KG is most likely meant the same as kg. Sometimes you just find it all in uppercase when it should be lowercase.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: ratio reinforcement in concrete?

              Anyone can help me? What is the reinforment/concrete ratio design (kg/m3) for a double storey terrace house?

              Lee.

              Mind reply to this e-mail: jetlskeat13@yahoo.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

                Not sure exactly what you mean, but you can take reinforced concrete to weigh 2400kg/m3

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: ratio reinforcement in concrete?

                  Originally posted by Unregistered
                  Anyone can help me? What is the reinforment/concrete ratio design (kg/m3) for a double storey terrace house?

                  Lee.

                  Mind reply to this e-mail: jetlskeat13@yahoo.com
                  ratio reinforcement is the percentage of armature in concrete section so,
                  in each time it depends on the element
                  for coloumns is between 1%-3% of the surface of section
                  for beams u can increase this value
                  and for the slabs normaly is about 1% of the thickness multiply by widthness

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

                    ok ok hold on, quit with the cubic meter junk, weight is in newtons, mass is in kg and kg/m^3 would be a density, so when someone tells you that value for concrete, they are saying it is "however many" Kg for every cubic meter used.

                    Location: canada... where we use the SI system...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: KN to KG

                      [QUOTE=Unregistered]Can any one help me please.


                      I WANT TO ASK, HOW TO MAKE 1 KN = 102 KG
                      THANKS

                      NDUR

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: KN to KG

                        [QUOTE=Unregistered]
                        Originally posted by Unregistered
                        Can any one help me please.


                        I WANT TO ASK, HOW TO MAKE 1 KN = 102 KG
                        THANKS

                        NDUR
                        The acceleration of "standard gravity" is 9.80665 m/s (at about 45 latitude and sea level), so the force of standard gravity acting on 1 kg is 9.80665 N. For 102 kg, that is 1000.278 N or 1.000 278 kN.

                        Note that real gravity, as opposed to standard gravity, varies slightly with latitude and altitude above sea level.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

                          Mass is typically expressed as volume (cubic meters or cubic feet); sometime people mistakenly equate mass to weight (kilograms or pounds); mass is volume only. So the question is what is the weight of the mass questioned.

                          Density is the relationship between weight and volume (kg/m3 or lbs/cf); density can also be referred to as unit weight... one cubic foot of normal weight concrete weighs ~145pcf.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

                            Originally posted by Dr Roxx View Post
                            Mass is typically expressed as volume (cubic meters or cubic feet); sometime people mistakenly equate mass to weight (kilograms or pounds); mass is volume only. So the question is what is the weight of the mass questioned.

                            Density is the relationship between weight and volume (kg/m3 or lbs/cf); density can also be referred to as unit weight... one cubic foot of normal weight concrete weighs ~145pcf.
                            Mass is NOT an expression of volume.

                            Volume is how much space something takes up. Mass or weight is how heavy it is.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: kg/m3 to KN/m3

                              Originally posted by Dr Roxx View Post
                              Mass is typically expressed as volume (cubic meters or cubic feet); sometime people mistakenly equate mass to weight (kilograms or pounds); mass is volume only. So the question is what is the weight of the mass questioned.

                              Density is the relationship between weight and volume (kg/m3 or lbs/cf); density can also be referred to as unit weight... one cubic foot of normal weight concrete weighs ~145pcf.
                              Mass is not volume, it is one of the 7 base units (kilogram) of the SI. In "common speech" mass and weight tend to be considered as equal. However, in technical speech, weight is the force of local gravity acting on a mass, and that force varies with location. On earth, it varies with latitude and altitude; it would be substantially different on the moon.

                              However, the confusion between weight and mass is so widespread that even NIST acknowledges that the verb "to weigh" means to determine the mass of.

                              When "weights" are compared on a balance beam scale, mass is being determined. On a "dishonest weight, chock full of springs" fish scale, weight is being determined.

                              The problem is made far worse in Customary/Imperial by using pound as unit of both mass (lbm) and force (lbf), and having a broken Newton's law F != ma unless you invent either a slug as a unit of mass OR a poundal as a unit of force, for the purpose of F = ma.

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