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  • m3/h

    I need to find out how to convert say 50,000 m3/h of an airflow at 90% relative humidity to its water equivalent when it passes through a dehumidifer prior to entering a spraydrying plant.

  • #2
    Re: m3/h

    Originally posted by peadarmac
    I need to find out how to convert say 50,000 m3/h of an airflow at 90% relative humidity to its water equivalent when it passes through a dehumidifer prior to entering a spraydrying plant.
    Hi, do you mean you want to find how much actual water is in your air in total, or do you want to find out how much water is left in your air after dehumidifying? any information you already have is really helpful to post, too.

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    • #3
      Re: m3/h

      The figure for the total amount of water in the air prior to dehumifying plus the amount of water which will be taken out of the air after dehumifying.
      I am not fully versed in the dehumidifying process or the actual relative humidity required dut i think a figure of 60% is needed in the air for spraydrying

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: m3/h

        Originally posted by peadarmac
        The figure for the total amount of water in the air prior to dehumifying plus the amount of water which will be taken out of the air after dehumifying.
        I am not fully versed in the dehumidifying process or the actual relative humidity required dut i think a figure of 60% is needed in the air for spraydrying
        Hi,

        You could try using this calculator:
        http://www.freedownloadscenter.com/B...sSimO_HCH.html

        I've not tried it my self, so am just suggesting it, not recommending it. You might want to do a bit of reading around the subject - pressure and temperature also play a very significant part in humidity measurements, and you haven't mentioned them. You need to find out about measuring them as well.

        This site might be worth having a look at too:
        http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/ps...rms-d_239.html

        Good luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: m3/h

          Originally posted by peadarmac
          The figure for the total amount of water in the air prior to dehumifying plus the amount of water which will be taken out of the air after dehumifying.
          I am not fully versed in the dehumidifying process or the actual relative humidity required dut i think a figure of 60% is needed in the air for spraydrying
          Hello peadarmac,

          Here is a table that shows the absolute humidity (water content) in grams per cubic meter at various combinations of temperature and relative humidity:
          Climate/humidity table
          http://www.tis-gdv.de/tis_e/misc/klima.htm
          Temperature has a very large effect on the water content of air. For example, using data from the table on the webpage, here is the amount of water that would be removed in reducing the humidity from 90% to 60% for air at various temperatures:
          Code:
                   |  Water Content |    Water Content     |   Water Removed
                   |  Grams Per m3  | Liters Per 50,000 m3 |      Per Hour
             Temp  |  Rel Humidity  |     Rel Humidity     | From RH 90% to 60%
              C   |   60%    90%   |      60%    90%      |  Liters  Gallons
            -------+----------------+----------------------+--------------------
              +30  |  18.2   27.3   |      910   1365      |    455     120
              +25  |  13.8   20.7   |      690   1035      |    345      91
              +20  |  10.4   15.6   |      520    780      |    260      69
          Notice that 75% more water is removed from air at +30C versus air at +20C (455 liters versus 260 liters).

          If you need to do any other calculations from the numbers on the webpage, here are the conversion factors to use:
          1 kilogram of water = 1 liter
          1 liter = 0.264 U.S. gallon

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: m3/h

            That's very right Roy. I couldn't say that better myself. I give you full kudos.
            Also Roy, instead of m3 as m to the third, you can also use m^3, or enter the keymap of your windows accessories and input m

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