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Teslas conversion formula?

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  • Teslas conversion formula?

    Ok now I need a conversion/Calculate formula that you know the weight and you know the distance the magnets are away and with calculating you can find the required taslas to lift the magnet. Please reply If you have any Ideas.

  • #2
    Re: Teslas conversion formula?

    It is relatively complex. Take a look near the end of this Wikipedia article for equations on magnetic force.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnet

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    • #3
      Re: Teslas conversion formula?

      Originally posted by JohnS
      It is relatively complex. Take a look near the end of this Wikipedia article for equations on magnetic force.
      ( have to Delete so called "spam"
      Well thanks and all but I can't understand a thing on the page lol
      Are you positive it's the correct formula?
      Last edited by //Jake\\; 01-23-2008, 05:56 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Teslas conversion formula?

        I'll have to get my Bro to interpret it for me )'.'(

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        • #5
          Re: Teslas conversion formula?

          Oh jeez I hate to try to make anyone do this but how many Teslas will it take to lift a 30,500 pound magnet from 4 feet away?:banana: :banana: :banana:

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          • #6
            Re: Teslas conversion formula?

            Tesla is a measure of magnetic field strength. That being said you have asked how many Tesla it would take to move a magnet 4 feet away. Thus more information is needed. First if the magnet you are trying to move is on a frictionless plane and it is near a wall of iron the magnet itself would pull itself to the wall. The second problem is that you have given no data on how large the surface of the magnet you are trying to move is with relation to the field strength of that magnet at the magnets surface nor the geometric shape of the magnet you are trying to move nor the shape of the iso-magnet field strength lines about the magnet that you are trying to move. The field lines can be mapped our with a gauss meter and can be visualized by placing iron filings on the floor about the magnet (better get permission to do this before hand). THe reason that the field lines are needed is that as the curvature of these lines represent magnetic field gradients that would map the available force at any point near the magnet. Think of it like this if you need to move the magnet (with another magnet or even with a just large piece of iron being used as a carrot in front of a rabbit) the iron or the second magnet will experience different forces at your magnet approaches them.
            Finally the surface that your magnet needs to slide on has a coefficient of friction as does the magnet itself. In order to overcome the friction and the initial momentum you should state these numbers and relative surface areas.
            If you are asking about a 15-ton magnet then you are most likely talking about a very high field superconducting magnet so I would guess that you are working with an non-actively shielded 3-Tesla magnet with about a 60-cm bore.?

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