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  • ug/L to mcg/L

    not sure what these mean but my daughter's bloodwork shows 2.5 ug/L mercury only thing I can find online to compare that that to is in mcg/dL form for mercury . How do I convert the ug/L to mcg/dL?

  • #2
    Re: ug/L to mcg/L

    The correct symbol for microgram is g, but since that is very tough to type on a keyboard, you will often see it listed as ug or mcg, but both mean microgram.

    The symbol l stands for liter, and the symbol dL stands for deciliter which is 0.1 liter.

    microgram/liter * 0.1 = microgram/deciliter

    microgram/deciliter * 10 = microgram/liter

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    • #3
      Re: ug/L to mcg/L

      Thanks for your help; that solved my problem and made it simple to read my results. I guess I still am learning something new everyday!

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      • #4
        Re: ug/L to mcg/L

        thanks that really helped!

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        • #5
          Re: ug/L to mcg/L

          I'm hoping you can help me as well! My son's lab results show 18 nmol of mercury and the doc & lab say that the norm is 5-9. (He's 5 and weighs 37lbs). This is from a specialist. My son's pediatrician however says this is all a hoax. She says that a normal range is actually less than 10 mcg/L. How do I convert nmol to mcg/L? Do you agree with these ranges if you happen to know about mercury? I'd be SO grateful for some help. If we have to chelate we have to spend and arm and a leg. If we don't chelate maybe he's walking around toxic? I don't know which side is accurate. Thanks!

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          • #6
            Re: ug/L to mcg/L

            Originally posted by Unregistered
            I'm hoping you can help me as well! My son's lab results show 18 nmol of mercury and the doc & lab say that the norm is 5-9. (He's 5 and weighs 37lbs). This is from a specialist. My son's pediatrician however says this is all a hoax. She says that a normal range is actually less than 10 mcg/L. How do I convert nmol to mcg/L? Do you agree with these ranges if you happen to know about mercury? I'd be SO grateful for some help. If we have to chelate we have to spend and arm and a leg. If we don't chelate maybe he's walking around toxic? I don't know which side is accurate. Thanks!
            Are you talking a blood, urine, or hair test? They all seem to give different normal ranges. For blood, 10 g/L or under seems to be normal. although 15 g/L are acceptable for exposed workers, and actual toxic levels are much higher.

            If your lab gave you results in nanomoles, it must actually include a specified volume, for example nmol/L. The molar mass of Hg is 200.6 g/mol. Therefore 10 g/L is approximately 50 nmol/L.
            10 g/L x 1 mol/200.6g = 49.85 nmol/L

            There is apparently some dubious mercury testing out there, and some test methods can exxagerate results. You may want to read this:
            http://www.quackwatch.org/01Quackery...curytests.html

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            • #7
              Re: ug/L to ng/ml

              I need to convert 42.7 ug/L to ng/ml......help?

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              • #8
                Re: ug/L to ng/ml

                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                I need to convert 42.7 ug/L to ng/ml......help?
                1 g = 1000 ng
                1 L = 1000 mL
                The two factors of 1000 cancel each other out, so 42.7 ng/mL.

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                • #9
                  Re: ug/L to mcg/L

                  I have metallous from 2 metal on metal hip replacements/revision. '05 & 07
                  Lab results as follows:
                  Chromium, Plasma is 15.9 ug/L Chromium, 24 Urine is 12.1 ug/L
                  Cobalt, Plasma is 21.6 ug/L Cobalt, 24 hr Urine is 107.5 ug/L
                  WBC is 12.1 K/uL
                  In comparison with other patients with hip replacements Metal to Metal, is this high?
                  Look forward to your interpretation.
                  Thx,
                  Penny
                  pmillerenterprises@cox.net

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                  • #10
                    Re: ug/L to mcg/L

                    A well functioning Metal/Metal hip replacement should have plasma chromium & Cobalt levels of 2ug/L . Yours are high

                    Australian Surgeon

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                    • #11
                      nmol/L to ug/L

                      Can anyone convert 61 nmol/L and 97 nmol/L into ug/L. All the literature I can find on chromium and cobalt ions is in the latter units but my results are in the former.

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                      • #12
                        Re: nmol/L to ug/L

                        Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                        Can anyone convert 61 nmol/L and 97 nmol/L into ug/L. All the literature I can find on chromium and cobalt ions is in the latter units but my results are in the former.
                        To convert between grams and moles, you need to know the molar mass, which is unique to the substance. It is numerically equal to the atomic or molecular weight of the substance in question.

                        Chromium: 51.9961 g/mol (round to 52)
                        Cobalt: 58.9322 g/mol (round to 59)

                        61 nmol/L x 52 g/mol = 3200 ng/L or 3.2 g/L for chromium
                        61 ng/L x 59 g/mol = 3600 ng/L = 3.6 g/L for cobalt

                        You can do the other the same way.

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                        • #13
                          Re: ug/L to mcg/L

                          please convert 120 ug to 90mcg

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                          • #14
                            Re: ug/L to mcg/L

                            Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                            please convert 120 ug to 90mcg
                            Take away 30 g? Both ug and mcg are improper symbols for microgram; the correct symbol is g, but they are all the same thing.

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                            • #15
                              Re: ug/L to mcg/L

                              I'm doing a project on mercury level. id 1.0 microgram per gram is 1 part per million how would i convert a mercury level of 8.86

                              Comment

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