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  • Re: how many ounces in a pint??

    1/2 Pint Of Raspberries Equals How Many Ounces?

  • #2
    Re: how many ounces in a pint??

    Originally posted by Unregistered
    1/2 Pint Of Raspberries Equals How Many Ounces?
    Produce is measured in dry pints, different from fluid pints.

    Per this source, http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-0829/ raspberries are 48 pounds per bushel. Scaling down, a dry pint would be 12 oz, and a half-pint would be 6 oz.

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    • #3
      Re: how many ounces in a pint??

      A fluid pint in the UK is 20 oz. and in the US it's 16 oz.

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      • #4
        Re: how many ounces in a pint??

        Originally posted by Unregistered
        A fluid pint in the UK is 20 oz. and in the US it's 16 oz.
        True, and to compound the problem, those fluid ounces are different sizes too, by about 5%.

        However, produce is often sold in dry pints and half pints, which are fractions of a bushel. Dry pints are not subdivided into dry ounces of volume. A dry pint is 1/64 of a bushel, which in turn is 2150.42 in³ in the US. (An Imperial bushel is 8 Imperial gallons)

        The avoirdupois ounce is a measure of weight, and 1/16 pound.

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        • #5
          Re: how many ounces in a pint??

          Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
          1/2 Pint Of Raspberries Equals How Many Ounces?
          12 ounces of dry weight

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          • #6
            Re: how many ounces in a pint??

            Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
            A fluid pint in the UK is 20 oz. and in the US it's 16 oz.
            I am Canadian, and until the 1970s, we used the British measuring system (20 oz pints). Many people still use measurements based on that (imperial) system because that is how older Canadian recipe books and all American ones present volume (mostly in portions, like 1/3 of an 8-oz cup).*

            Now, though Canada officially uses the metric system, where 1 cup ~ 250 ml (ml means millilitres). Conversions are easy: simply multiply or divide by tens (like one thousandth of a litre (l) is a millilitre (ml), 5 of which equal an American teaspoon teaspoon. One l (litre) contains 1000 ml, about the same as two American pints.

            In some posts on this site, I have noticed people confusing one ounce measurements, because one oz. of weight is different than one oz. of volume (exception: I think 1 fl. oz. of water might weigh 1 ounce?). That is a mistake that can't be made in metric, because we weigh in kilograms and measure volume in litres (or tenths or thousandths of a litre if measuring small amounts).

            The U.S. is the last nation in the developed world to stick with imperial measures, odd since you guys threw off the Brit crown so long ago and created a government based partially on a French model, which is where the metric system was invented! It makes life difficult for companies from other places that export goods to the U.S. (Dutch cocoa, for instance), since everything has to be re-labelled to ship to your country (vs. all their other export markets).

            *side note: European recipe book often measure everything, like flour, by weight, not volume. You need a kitchen scale there to measure out your ingredients. Apparently it is more accurate (consistent) for some reason. Does anyone know why???

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            • #7
              Re: how many ounces in a pint??

              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
              I am Canadian, and until the 1970s, we used the British measuring system (20 oz pints). Many people still use measurements based on that (imperial) system because that is how older Canadian recipe books and all American ones present volume (mostly in portions, like 1/3 of an 8-oz cup).*

              Now, though Canada officially uses the metric system, where 1 cup ~ 250 ml (ml means millilitres). Conversions are easy: simply multiply or divide by tens (like one thousandth of a litre (l) is a millilitre (ml), 5 of which equal an American teaspoon teaspoon. One l (litre) contains 1000 ml, about the same as two American pints.

              In some posts on this site, I have noticed people confusing one ounce measurements, because one oz. of weight is different than one oz. of volume (exception: I think 1 fl. oz. of water might weigh 1 ounce?). That is a mistake that can't be made in metric, because we weigh in kilograms and measure volume in litres (or tenths or thousandths of a litre if measuring small amounts).

              The U.S. is the last nation in the developed world to stick with imperial measures, odd since you guys threw off the Brit crown so long ago and created a government based partially on a French model, which is where the metric system was invented! It makes life difficult for companies from other places that export goods to the U.S. (Dutch cocoa, for instance), since everything has to be re-labelled to ship to your country (vs. all their other export markets).

              *side note: European recipe book often measure everything, like flour, by weight, not volume. You need a kitchen scale there to measure out your ingredients. Apparently it is more accurate (consistent) for some reason. Does anyone know why???
              Gallon: In US measure, 1 gallon water is 8.334 lb at max density, 8 pt/gallon, so 1.04 lb/pt, (or av oz/fl oz) so quite close to 1. The Imperial gallon is 10 lb, or 160 av oz; it is also 160 fl oz, so 1 av oz/fl oz exactly. (The US gallon is a Queen Anne wine gallon, a pre-Imperial measure, from back when we were loyal British citizens; it is 231 in³, exactly.)

              Weighing: The bulk density of all powders is quite variable, depending on the degree to which they are compacted, vibrated, or just allowed to settle over time. This includes recipe ingredients like flour and sugar. Also, the way the ingredients are ground can affect the density (kosher salt is usually flaked and has lower density than regular table salt). Sifted flour will have a different density than flour spooned into a measuring cup from the flour container.
              (Finally, for large commercial recipes, weighing is just easier)

              Unfortunately flour and sugar are also hygroscopic (absorb water vapor from humid air). This can affect weighed ingredients so it's a bit of a toss-up.

              Either method can be made to work. If you cook recipes in either system frequently, it is better to have the correct measuring equipment than to convert all the time. Many of the published conversions give substantially different values from different sources. I have an electronic scale that measures to 1 g resolution. If I cook a European recipe, I use it, but I use measuring cups for US recipes.

              Labelling: We don't just use Customary (which has some differences from Imperial, like the gallon, bushel, and ton). We generally require dual labeling, metric and US Customary units. I believe the USC is allowed in many other markets as long as the metric is there (not sure about customer acceptance). A few markets forbid any other unit and our exports need a unique label too. There is a proposal to amend the Fair Packaging and Labelling Act to allow either metric-only or dual (metric/Customary) but it hasn't gone anywhere. There are also some differences in US vs EU nutrition label requirements.
              Last edited by JohnS; 06-10-2013, 03:57 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: how many ounces in a pint??

                Thanks for the existence of this site, but I'm still confused.

                One response says 1/2 pint of raspberries is 12 oz. and another says 1/2 pint of raspberries is 6 oz.

                I don't really care whether Imperial is better than Metric, or if measuring by weight not volume in baking is a good idea; I would really like to know how many 6 oz. containers of raspberries I need to equate 1 pint of raspberries so I can make raspberry sorbet.

                (I'm not the same Unregistered user as before, but I am a Canadian who had to switch from Imperial to Metric in the 1970's. As such, I weigh myself in pounds, my height in feet and inches, measurements in whatever is more accurate, cold temperatures in Celcius and warm temperatures in Fahrenheit. Go figure.)

                Keep up the awesome discussions of measurements!

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                • #9
                  Re: how many ounces in a pint??

                  Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                  Thanks for the existence of this site, but I'm still confused.

                  One response says 1/2 pint of raspberries is 12 oz. and another says 1/2 pint of raspberries is 6 oz.

                  I don't really care whether Imperial is better than Metric, or if measuring by weight not volume in baking is a good idea; I would really like to know how many 6 oz. containers of raspberries I need to equate 1 pint of raspberries so I can make raspberry sorbet.

                  (I'm not the same Unregistered user as before, but I am a Canadian who had to switch from Imperial to Metric in the 1970's. As such, I weigh myself in pounds, my height in feet and inches, measurements in whatever is more accurate, cold temperatures in Celcius and warm temperatures in Fahrenheit. Go figure.)

                  Keep up the awesome discussions of measurements!
                  See post #2, which quotes an actual source. 1 dry pt of rasberries is about 12 av oz, a half pint, 6 av oz. Approximately true for most berry sized fruits including grape and cherry tomatoes. So two 6 oz containers should be very close to a pint.

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