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Weight of rock by volume

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  • Weight of rock by volume

    I'm getting quotes from a landscaper and wanted to validate his numbers. He is laying a couple courses of stone which is approximately 3 1/2" thick and 9" wide. The lineage (sp?) is about 70 feet. My question is: how much does typical rock weigh? He says he needs about a ton but I don't know how much this weighs. I guess the cubic inches would be 3.5 x 9 x 840 or 26,460. I'm having trouble finding anything that says how much typical rock weighs.

    TIA

  • #2
    Re: Weight of rock by volume

    Originally posted by Unregistered
    I'm getting quotes from a landscaper and wanted to validate his numbers. He is laying a couple courses of stone which is approximately 3 1/2" thick and 9" wide. The lineage (sp?) is about 70 feet. My question is: how much does typical rock weigh? He says he needs about a ton but I don't know how much this weighs. I guess the cubic inches would be 3.5 x 9 x 840 or 26,460. I'm having trouble finding anything that says how much typical rock weighs.

    TIA
    It would depend on the kind of rock. I'm guessing about as much as concrete, about 2 ton/yd.

    Your 26460 in is 15.3 ft or 0.57 yd, so roughly 1.1 ton.

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    • #3
      Re: Weight of rock by volume

      Thanks John.
      That gives me a good number to work with.

      Does anyone know if there's some sort of reference table somewhere that tells what the weight of various substances is? ...water, dirt, bedrock, feathers, burritos??

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Weight of rock by volume

        Originally posted by Unregistered
        Thanks John.
        That gives me a good number to work with.

        Does anyone know if there's some sort of reference table somewhere that tells what the weight of various substances is? ...water, dirt, bedrock, feathers, burritos??
        There's lots. It is called density, use Google.

        For construction material, stone, dirt, and the like, I use one from American Coupler Systems (ACS) which seems pretty good but there are others. (It mostly covers broken rock, not solid slabs)

        For the burritto, I recommend the USDA database, or the nutrition label on the box (gives a serving size in Customary and metric) or the net contents label.

        Water = 1 g/cm = 1 kg/L = 1 t/m (not so nice in Customary, 8.33 lb/gallon, 62.4 lb/ft, 1685 lb/yd)

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