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  • lb/ft to in/lb

    I have a unit conversion issue at work: we have 5 pounds per foot, and we need to know how many inches are in one pound.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. I need a formula, because it looks like this is the first of many such conversions from lb/ft to in/lb.

    Thanks,

    James

  • #2
    Re: lb/ft to in/lb

    Originally posted by Unregistered
    I have a unit conversion issue at work: we have 5 pounds per foot, and we need to know how many inches are in one pound.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. I need a formula, because it looks like this is the first of many such conversions from lb/ft to in/lb.

    Thanks,

    James
    First, construct the reciprocal. If it is 5 lb/ft, then it is 1 ft/5 lb = 0.2 ft/lb. Then convert the foot to inches
    0.2 ft/lb x 12 in/ft = 2.4 in/lb

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: lb/ft to in/lb

      Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
      I have a unit conversion issue at work: we have 5 pounds per foot, and we need to know how many inches are in one pound.

      Any help would be greatly appreciated. I need a formula, because it looks like this is the first of many such conversions from lb/ft to in/lb.

      Thanks,

      James
      You are getting your unit values mixed up.

      1- a pound is a unit of weight; an inch is a unit of distance; they are not the same and cannot be converted to each other. A pound will always equal 32 oz and a foot will always equal 12 inches. eg. (5 lb / 1 ft) = (5 lb / 12 in) = (0.4166 lb / 1 in)

      2- a lb-ft not lb/ft is a unit value for torque. Picture a shaft with a 1ft or 12 inch arm affixed to it at say the 3:00 position. Hanging a 1 pound weight at the end of the arm creates a 1 lb-ft of torque on the shaft. (1 lb-ft = 12 lb-in).

      2- ft-lb not ft/lb is a unit value for energy expended or work. Picture a 1 pound weight on a flat surface. Moving the weight 1 foot or 12 inches expends 1 ft-lb of energy or uses 1ft-lb of work to accomplish the task. (1 ft-lb) = 12 in-lb)

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: lb/ft to in/lb

        Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
        You are getting your unit values mixed up.

        1- a pound is a unit of weight; an inch is a unit of distance; they are not the same and cannot be converted to each other. A pound will always equal 32 oz and a foot will always equal 12 inches. eg. (5 lb / 1 ft) = (5 lb / 12 in) = (0.4166 lb / 1 in)

        2- a lb-ft not lb/ft is a unit value for torque. Picture a shaft with a 1ft or 12 inch arm affixed to it at say the 3:00 position. Hanging a 1 pound weight at the end of the arm creates a 1 lb-ft of torque on the shaft. (1 lb-ft = 12 lb-in).

        2- ft-lb not ft/lb is a unit value for energy expended or work. Picture a 1 pound weight on a flat surface. Moving the weight 1 foot or 12 inches expends 1 ft-lb of energy or uses 1ft-lb of work to accomplish the task. (1 ft-lb) = 12 in-lb)
        A pound is 16 oz, actually. Your comments are correct about torque but lb/ft is a reasonable unit for spring rate of a spring; in/lb, besides the conversion of feet to inches, is a reciprocal spring rate.

        Comment

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