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Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

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  • Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

    Hi I am reading a paper where they talk about blood glucose values being below 1.10g/l - please can you tell me how to convert this to mmol/l

  • #2
    Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

    Hi I am reading a paper where they talk about blood glucose values being below 1.10g/l - please can you tell me how to convert this to mmol/l

    To convert mmol/l of glucose to mg/dl, multiply by 18.

    To convert mg/dl of glucose to mmol/l, divide by 18 or multiply by 0.055.

    1.10g/l=1100mg/l=1100mg/10dl=110mg/dl

    110*0.055=6.05 mmol/l
    1.1g/l=6.05 mmol/l

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    • #3
      Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

      Originally posted by Unregistered
      Hi I am reading a paper where they talk about blood glucose values being below 1.10g/l - please can you tell me how to convert this to mmol/l

      To convert mmol/l of glucose to mg/dl, multiply by 18.

      To convert mg/dl of glucose to mmol/l, divide by 18 or multiply by 0.055.

      1.10g/l=1100mg/l=1100mg/10dl=110mg/dl

      110*0.055=6.05 mmol/l
      1.1g/l=6.05 mmol/l
      18 is the molar mass of water (2 x 1 + 16 = 18) H2O, H=2g/mol, O=18g/mol

      Glucose is different (CxHyOz). Use C=12g/mol, H=1g/mol, O=16g/mol). These values are near enough, but not exact. Use a periodic table if you need the values to more accurate figures.

      There are 100mL in 1dL, and 100mL in 1L

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      • #4
        Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

        Originally posted by Mrs X
        18 is the molar mass of water (2 x 1 + 16 = 18) H2O, H=2g/mol, O=18g/mol

        Glucose is different (CxHyOz). Use C=12g/mol, H=1g/mol, O=16g/mol). These values are near enough, but not exact. Use a periodic table if you need the values to more accurate figures.

        There are 100mL in 1dL, and 100mL in 1L
        It's a trick. The MW of glucose is 180 Da, but the change from liter to deciliter throws in a factor of 10, so the composite factor is 18. (I was confused by it in a previous note and had to work my way through the numbers.)

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        • #5
          Re: g/l to mmol/l conversion

          The original question asks about g/L to mmol/L, so the 18 and dL were very confusing. I didn't help either, sorry.

          OP, you need to find out the molecular weight of your glucose (180g/mol??).

          This means that a solution with 180g/L is a 1Msolution.

          A solution with 180mg/L is a 1mMsolution

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