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  • #31
    Re: mEq to mg conversion

    Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
    i AM TRYING TO CONVERT MILLIEQUIVILANTS TO MILLIGRAMS. HOW IS THIS DONE?
    You need the charge of the ion to convert equivalents to moles, and you need the molar mass to convert to grams.

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    • #32
      Re: mEq to mg conversion

      Convert chloride to potassium chloride

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      • #33
        Re: mEq to mg conversion

        Originally posted by JohnS View Post
        Since potassium ionizes to K+ in water (single valence charge) 25 mEq = 25 mmol. The molar mass is 39.1 g/mol = 978 mg.
        This matches the information I found at the RxList.com website for Micro-K® time release potassium chloride:

        "Micro-K (potassium chloride extended-release) ® Extencaps® capsules and Micro-K (potassium chloride extended-release) ® 10 Extencaps® capsules are oral dosage forms of microencapsulated potassium chloride containing 600 and 750 mg, respectively, of potassium chloride USP equivalent to 8 and 10 mEq of potassium."

        I also discovered the mEq is "molar equivalent" rather than "medical equivalent", which makes the general concept easier to understand, which is fabulous . . .

        Fabulous!

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        • #34
          Re: mEq to mg conversion

          Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
          This matches the information I found at the RxList.com website for Micro-K® time release potassium chloride:

          "Micro-K (potassium chloride extended-release) ® Extencaps® capsules and Micro-K (potassium chloride extended-release) ® 10 Extencaps® capsules are oral dosage forms of microencapsulated potassium chloride containing 600 and 750 mg, respectively, of potassium chloride USP equivalent to 8 and 10 mEq of potassium."

          I also discovered the mEq is "molar equivalent" rather than "medical equivalent", which makes the general concept easier to understand, which is fabulous . . .

          Fabulous!
          Note 1: mEq is "milli equivalent", which is one thousandth of an equivalent. An "equivalent" can be the same as a mole, but it does depend on the nature of what is being examined. For potassium (K) 1 equivalent = 1 mole.

          Note 2: the website mentioned above: http://www.rxlist.com/micro-k-drug.htm

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          • #35
            mEq to mg conversion

            Looking to convert 595mg K gluconate to mEq of KCl

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            • #36
              Re: mEq to mg conversion

              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
              Looking to convert 595mg K gluconate to mEq of KCl
              On what basis for equivalence since potassium gluconate ISN'T potassium chloride?

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              • #37
                Re: mEq to mg conversion

                Perhaps what someone needs to know here is that MOLES are like PAIRS or DOZENS. There are 2 like items in a pair (of shoes, e.g.); 12 like items in a dozen (eggs, e.g.) and 6.022 X 10^23 like items in a mole (of atoms or molecules, e.g.).

                Trying to convert a milliequivalent of potassium gluconate into milligrams of potassium chloride "doesn't compute". It's like subtracting five shoes and a banana from ten pairs of shoes.

                It is easy enough to convert a milliequivalent of potassium chloride (which K-lyte is) to milligrams of potassium chloride (of, say, another brand). However, it is IMPOSSIBLE to convert a milliequivalent of potassium chloride to milligrams of an UNKNOWN potassium salt.

                Dr. Sheldon Cooper (and, by the way, I'm NOT a chemist; I'm a theoretical physicist).

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                • #38
                  Re: mEq to mg conversion

                  74.5 mg of Potassium Chloride = 1 mmol or 1mEq of Potassium
                  Got this information from my hospital pharmacy manual !

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                  • #39
                    Re: mEq to mg conversion

                    For those of you asking on this thread for medical reasons, I would recommend (as a doctor):
                    a) ask the manufacturer directly: how many mEq per dose (tablet/capsule/whatever) in this particular product, and then
                    b) discuss directly with your doctor - I'd like to switch from X to Y and I've found out this information about dosing. Is this safe?

                    ....all BEFORE switching.

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                    • #40
                      Re: mEq to mg conversion

                      como covierto 2.1 mEq a mg/dl

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                      • #41
                        Re: mEq to mg conversion for Potassium

                        Hi,
                        I am a physician and I prescribe potassium frequently. I have never seen potassium tablets dosed in mg - probably because of the confusion in converting between various chemical forms of potassium, (potassium-chloride, potassium-bicarbonate, potassium-citrate) we ONLY use mEq dosing. The "40 mg" tablet you are talking about is almost certainly actually 40 mEq. If it was 40 mg of even pure potassium (not available as a drug) it would only provide 1 mEq of elemental potassium - that's a trivial amount of potassium, if it was potassium chloride, the most concentrated form of potassium available as a drug, it would be about 0.5 mEq potassium - even more trivial.

                        Further confusion results from dietary information. Potassium content in food is usually given in mg, but this number is actually referring to elemental potassium. To convert dietary potassium in mg to mEq, just divide by the molecular weight of potassium which is about 40.

                        So, a banana has about 400 mg of potassium, this is equivalent to a 10 mEq potassium tablet. A half-cup of raisins has 550 mg of potassium, or 14 mEq.

                        Hope this helps!!

                        Tim McNaughton MD PhD

                        For more information Google "Mayo Clinic potassium supplements."

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                        • #42
                          Re: mEq to mg conversion

                          Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                          I am trying to convert from K-lyte potassium tablets which are 25mEq to another potassium tablet which has 40 milligrams per tablet in order to know how much of the tablet to take. please help. thank you
                          to another potassium tablet which has 40 milligrams per tablet in order to know how much of the tablet to take. please help. thank you[/QUOTE]

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                          • #43
                            Re: mEq to mg conversion

                            sodium 45 meq to mg
                            potassium 20 meq to mg
                            chloride 35 meq to mg

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                            • #44
                              Re: mEq to mg conversion

                              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                              sodium 45 meq to mg
                              potassium 20 meq to mg
                              chloride 35 meq to mg
                              All carry a single charge in ionized form, so meq is equivalent to mmol (millimoles).
                              45 mmol Na x 22.99 g/mol = 1034.6 mg
                              20 mmol K x 39.1 g/mol = 782 mg
                              35 mmol Cl x 35.453 g/mol = 1241 mg

                              (The molar masses are numerically equal to the atomic weights)

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                              • #45
                                Re: mEq to mg conversion

                                I am a pharmacist and here is what I can tell you.

                                Meq is based on molecular weight.

                                The molecular weight of potassium chloride=74.55mg or 75mg
                                In pharmacy we use 10mg=750mg so you can convert from this.

                                Potassium Gluconate
                                234.25 is the molecular weight which is =1 meq so the commonly found 99mg tablet is equivalent to 0.42meq

                                Hope this helps!

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