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  • mmol/L

    How do I convert mmol/L to meq/L

  • #2
    Re: mmol/L

    Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
    How do I convert mmol/L to meq/L
    Moles and equivalents are closely rated. Equivalents consider the valence charge of the ion, either positive or negative, but 1, 2, or 3 electron charges:
    Charge of +1 or -1: 1 mole = 1 equiv.
    Charge of +2 or -2: 1 mole = 2 equiv.
    Charge of +3 or -3: 1 mole = 3 equiv.

    Basically 1 equivalent is one mole of electrons transfered between a donor and acceptor.

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    • #3
      Re: mmol/L

      Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
      How do I convert mmol/L to meq/L
      As JohnS says, it depends on the valencies of the species involved. However, it can be a bit more complicated than that, as it takes into account the molecule or ion involved, and the number of electrons required to balance the electronic (chemical) equation to produce the material of interest.

      For example, producing ammonia from nitrate:

      NO3(-) + 10H+ + 8e- gives NH4(+) + 3H2O, so 8 eqivalents per mole of Nitrate.

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      • #4
        Re: mmol/L

        you folks are the best thank you very much

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        • #5
          Re: mmol/L

          Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
          How do I convert meq/L to mmol/L
          how much is 8 meq/L converted to mmol/L

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          • #6
            Re: mmol/L

            Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
            How do I convert mmol/L to meq/L
            how much is 4.9mmoi/l to mg/dl

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            • #7
              conversion

              is mmol/l the same with meq/l

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              • #8
                Re: conversion

                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                is mmol/l the same with meq/l
                Maybe. It depends. An equivalent is a mole of electrons passed in a reference reaction. It depends on the ionic charge of the substance of interest (and in more complex cases, on the reaction) See post #2.

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