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  • #16
    Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to 2 inches of snow

    Originally posted by Jan from Humboldt View Post
    snow? or are there too many variables to do this sort of converson.
    don't care re variables

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

      one inch of rain is equal to 10 inches of snow

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      • #18
        Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

        There's a huge amount of variation when trying to calculate the amount snow from the equivalent amount of rain. The U.S. Geological Survey's website,

        (I'm a new user and not allowed to post links, but if you Google ""volume of snow from rain" , it should be the first link)

        gives a range from 4-5 inches (the wetest, heaviest snow), to about 20 inches for dry powder. You really need to know something about the temerature and humidity in addition to the amount of rain to get an idea about snowfall amounts.

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        • #19
          Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

          Originally posted by searunner52 View Post
          I was always told that 1" of rainfall was the equivalant of 10" of powder snow! The heavier the snow the higher the moisture content the fewer inches of snow per inch of rain.

          Now where this originally came from I don't know - It was something my grandfather passed on to me - he said that this was the way they measured snowfall back in the old country (Germany)
          Are you sure "Old Country" doesn't mean "Google"?
          That is exactly what posts all over the net say about rain-snow conversions, almost word for word.

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          • #20
            Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

            The ratio can vary considerabally based on temperature. Here is a link to a noaa site with a rather complete table.
            The folks who run this site will not allow me to post a link to a noaa site so maybe I can modify it so it does not look like a link but a human can convert it back.
            www.erh.noaa.gov/box/tables/snowfall-meltwater.html

            mcl
            (retired meteorologist...worked for the AF for 35+ years)

            MOD NOTE: Link restored above, thanks for info. Only registered members with at least a few posts can post links. JohnS

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            • #21
              Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of cup

              Convert 1 inch of rainfall to ounces of cup of water

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              • #22
                Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of cup

                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                Convert 1 inch of rainfall to ounces of cup of water
                Multiply by the area in square inches of the opening at the top of the cup to get cubic inches. As 128 fl oz = 231 in³ = 1 gallon, multiply the cubic inches by 128/231 to get fluid ounces

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                • #23
                  Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                  This storm here would produce like 1 ft. of rain that would be like 6'3" of snow!

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                  • #24
                    Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                    Originally posted by searunner52 View Post
                    I was always told that 1" of rainfall was the equivalant of 10" of powder snow! The heavier the snow the higher the moisture content the fewer inches of snow per inch of rain.

                    Now where this originally came from I don't know - It was something my grandfather passed on to me - he said that this was the way they measured snowfall back in the old country (Germany)

                    My family is also from Germany and I don't remember anyone in the old country converting 1 INCH of rain to 10 INCHES of snow.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                      Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                      My family is also from Germany and I don't remember anyone in the old country converting 1 INCH of rain to 10 INCHES of snow.
                      Maybe the Grandfather was referring to a song by George Jones that he sang about the snow always turning to rain in a country song and they got confused?

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                      • #26
                        Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                        how do you caculate if four inches of heavy wet snow are equivalent to two inches of rain estimate the water content in 8 inches of heavy wet snow.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                          We are asking rain into snow not snow into water.
                          If we have six inches of rain in a day at 34 degrees had it been colder and the rain was snow, how much snow would we have had? That is the question here.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                            Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                            We are asking rain into snow not snow into water.
                            If we have six inches of rain in a day at 34 degrees had it been colder and the rain was snow, how much snow would we have had? That is the question here.
                            Lots of notes on 2nd page of this thread. Depending on temperature or how wet the snow is, an inch of rain could be anywhere from 3" - 20" of snow. The 3" for very wet, slushy snow, 20" for very light powder. It really depends on what the temperature would have slipped to. Probably 6" snow per inch of rain, if just below freezing; higher ratios require much colder weather.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Convert 1 inch of rain to ? inches of

                              I live in central Alberta. I have shovelled snow for the past two years with the intention of piling it up against relatively newly planted shrubs. This does two things: it protects the plants from harsh winds and premature climate thaws; and it waters the plants upon melting.

                              I have noticed in my area that the snow is light and powdery (increasingly so) from about November to mid-January (as the average temperature lowers). The snow quality becomes heavier from January to end of April (as the average temperature increases).

                              This is by no means a scientific study but it is what my muscles in association with my brain tell me.

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