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  • sugar cubes

    How many cubes of sugar in a cup?

  • #2
    Re: sugar cubes

    I did some searching and found that sugar cubes are 1/2 inch squares. That means each cube is 0.125 cubic inches.

    1 cup (U.S.) = 14.4375 cubic inches

    14.4375 / 0.125 = 115.5 cubes / cup

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    • #3
      Re: sugar cubes

      Wow, I had no idea. By the time I would count out that many cubes I could go to the store and buy a bag of granulated to fill my hummingbird feeder.

      Thx

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      • #4
        Re: sugar cubes

        No, this isn't correct. One sugar cube is one teaspoon of sugar. There are 48 teaspoons in one cup. The answer is 48.

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        • #5
          Re: sugar cubes

          If you go by the calorie count there are 25 calories in a sugar cube and there are 770 calories in a cup of sugar. So 30.8 or 31 sugar cubes would equal a cup. A sugar cube is listed as a heaping teaspoon of sugar.

          Here is the link I used

          http://www.annecollins.com/calories/calories-sugar.htm

          Sugar (Serving size) Calories
          Table Sugar, 1 level teaspoon (4g) 15
          Table Sugar, 1 heaped teaspoon (6g) 25
          Table Sugar, 1 cup 770
          Table Sugar, average (1 cube) 25
          Icing Sugar, 1 average tablespoon (12g) 48
          Last edited by Sandra; 07-01-2008, 10:45 PM.

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          • #6
            Re: sugar cubes

            Originally posted by Sandra
            If you go by the calorie count there are 25 calories in a sugar cube and there are 770 calories in a cup of sugar. So 30.8 or 31 sugar cubes would equal a cup. A sugar cube is listed as a heaping teaspoon of sugar.

            Here is the link I used

            http://www.annecollins.com/calories/calories-sugar.htm

            Sugar (Serving size) Calories
            Table Sugar, 1 level teaspoon (4g) 15
            Table Sugar, 1 heaped teaspoon (6g) 25
            Table Sugar, 1 cup 770
            Table Sugar, average (1 cube) 25
            Icing Sugar, 1 average tablespoon (12g) 48
            I think sugar cubes are not completely standardized. We've gotten at least two different sizes from our store. I checked the nutrition label of our current box, they are 2.5 g, 10 calories per cube. While two dimensions are 1/2", the other is about 7/16". Accepting Sandra's value of 25 calories, her cubes are considerable bigger. Mine are a scant teaspoon (actually about 2/3). So the correct answer is "YMMV."

            Edit: I think Sandra has outlined a good approach above. Use the nutrition label on your particular package of sugar cubes to get either the calories or the weight in grams for 1 sugar cube. Divide it into the data for a cup of sugar (USDA database gives 774 calories, 200 g) to get the number of your sugar cubes per cup.
            Last edited by JohnS; 07-02-2008, 09:35 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: sugar cubes

              Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
              No, this isn't correct. One sugar cube is one teaspoon of sugar. There are 48 teaspoons in one cup. The answer is 48.
              Interesting. What a difference a fraction of an inch makes. 115.5 cubes/cup is almost twice 48 cubes/cup ( actually 2.4; 2.4 x 48 = 115.5)

              The closest rational dimension for 48 cubes per cup is 5/8" per side = 0.625" ( instead of 1/2" = 0.5"). 5/8" is 1/8" over 1/2".

              One teaspoon is 0.3 in^3 or 0.67" per side ( 0.67 x 0.67 x 0.67 = 0.3)

              5/8" = 15.876 mm

              17 mm ( 0.67") would be the best dimension of a cube so that 48 cubes is one cup.

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              • #8
                Re: sugar cubes

                Interesting. What a difference a fraction of an inch makes. 115.5 cubes/cup is almost twice 48 cubes/cup ( actually 2.4; 2.4 x 48 = 115.5)

                The closest rational dimension for 48 cubes per cup is 5/8" per side = 0.625" ( instead of 1/2" = 0.5"). 5/8" is 1/8" over 1/2".

                One teaspoon is 0.3 in3 or 0.67" per side ( 0.67 x 0.67 x 0.67 = 0.3)

                5/8" = 15.876 mm

                17 mm ( 0.67") would be the best dimension of a cube so that 48 cubes is one cup.
                I entered the above post before I registered as unitVerse ( in case you require further explaination :angel.

                To use 'Material Balance' the volume and effective density are required, not just volume ( assuming 100% sugar, no filler, etc).

                If energy is the computation goal ( ie dietary Calorie = 1 Kilo-Calorie = 4186.8 Joule) then Sandra's approach is most interesting.
                Last edited by unitVerse; 10-02-2011, 02:29 PM. Reason: provide followup information

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                • #9
                  Re: sugar cubes

                  Originally posted by unitVerse View Post
                  I entered the above post before I registered as unitVerse ( in case you require further explaination :angel.

                  To use 'Material Balance' the volume and effective density are required, not just volume ( assuming 100% sugar, no filler, etc).

                  If energy is the computation goal ( ie dietary Calorie = 1 Kilo-Calorie) then Sandra's approach is most interesting.
                  And the density of powders is generally variable; it is increased by tapping or compacting. The act of forming a sugar cube is likely to result in a different volume than the loose sugar from which it is made.

                  I think comparison has to be made by energy (as Sandra did) or mass, not volume. Per USDA database (link in our resource section), sugar is 200 g/cup, 4.2 g/tsp or 2.3 g/cube. Within rounding this is very close to 48 tsp/cup, and Domino Sugar's claim of 198 cubes (Dots) per pound.

                  Thus 200 g/cup divided by 2.3 g/cube gives around 87 cubes per cup of loose sugar

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                  • #10
                    you are all wrong...

                    i took a bag and smashed up sugar cubes with a meat tenderizer. then i poured repeatedly poured in my bag of sugar. it was filled up after i smashed 55 cubes. to keep up for the little holes cause by big chunks, maybe 56. so 55-56 cubes equals 1 cup of sugar.

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                    • #11
                      Re: sugar cubes

                      Hey! Just doing this myself today. Came up with 40 cubes to use.

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                      • #12
                        Re: sugar cubes

                        If a sugar cube weights very close to 5 grams, what is the volume of the cube?

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                        • #13
                          Re: sugar cubes

                          Originally posted by pointman View Post
                          How many cubes of sugar in a cup?
                          LMAO seen alot of confilcting anwsers here...lol So I called C&H (who Knew !!lol)
                          Spoke to Caroline July 3 2012, she said there are......48 (standard Cubes) in a cup.
                          at first she told me 96 BUT that was for the DOTS lol So 48 cubes in a cup,easy math

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                          • #14
                            Re: sugar cubes

                            This has been a fascinating discussion.

                            Who knew sugar cubes could keep me so interested.

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                            • #15
                              Re: sugar cubes

                              Originally posted by pointman View Post
                              How many cubes of sugar in a cup?
                              Fill a cup with sugar cubes.
                              Count them.
                              Repeat this experiment five to 30 times.
                              Use a histogram to find the most likely value. Wiki has rules for making histograms.

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