Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Converting 10mg/ml of insulin into 100nm

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Converting 10mg/ml of insulin into 100nm

    Hello I am trying to convert 10mg/ml concentration of stock insulin with a volume of 5ml into a concentration 100nm into volume 100ml of DMEM. How much volume would I need to add from the 5ml stock volume to make this reagent as well?
    Thanks for time and help

  • #2
    Originally posted by tareq View Post
    Hello I am trying to convert 10mg/ml concentration of stock insulin with a volume of 5ml into a concentration 100nm into volume 100ml of DMEM. How much volume would I need to add from the 5ml stock volume to make this reagent as well?
    Thanks for time and help
    Hi there, please can you just define in words what you mean by "concentration 100nm into volume 100mL"? - 100 nm is a length (100 nanometers), so i'm guessing you either mean a resulting concentration of 100 nM (100 nano-molar, i.e. 100nanonoles per litre), or you mean 100 nanomoles, which is an amount, to be diluted to 100mL, giving a resulting concentration of 1 然 (1 micromolar, or 1 micromole per litre). This is just a guess though, and until we know what you are requiring we might cause more confusion by answering.

    - You have to be quite careful when writing or typing the case for metric units. Lower case and upper case mean different things.
    Last edited by Mrs X; 08-05-2015, 10:27 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mrs X View Post

      Hi there, please can you just define in words what you mean by "concentration 100nm into volume 100mL"? - 100 nm is a length (100 nanometers), so i'm guessing you either mean a resulting concentration of 100 nM (100 nano-molar, i.e. 100nanonoles per litre), or you mean 100 nanomoles, which is an amount, to be diluted to 100mL, giving a resulting concentration of 1 然 (1 micromolar, or 1 micromole per litre). This is just a guess though, and until we know what you are requiring we might cause more confusion by answering.

      - You have to be quite careful when writing or typing the case for metric units. Lower case and upper case mean different things.
      I meant was 100 NanoMolar sorry for the misunderstanding, I will take much further care when writing these metric units

      Comment


      • #4
        100 nmol/L x 0.1 L = 10 nmol
        To convert to grams, you need molar mass of insulin. Per Wikipedia, molecular weight is 5808 Da, so 5808 g/mol
        10 nmol 5808 g/mol = 58.08 痢
        Your stock solution is 10 mg/mL or 10 痢/無, 58.08 痢 x 1 無/10 痢 = 5.808 無, diluted to 100 mL
        You may have trouble measuring this small amount and may want a double dilution, or even triple

        Another way to look at this, 100 nmol/L x 5808 g/mol = 580.8 痢/L concentration, your stock is 10 g/L.
        You need a net dilution of 17218:1. Mrs X may be better able to advise the best way to do such a dilution.

        Comment


        • #5
          I was pondering on the same question and here is my way of solving it. Hopefully, you'll like it.
          So we have a stock of 10mg/ml insulin. Now molecular weight of Insulin is 5808 kD or 5808 g/L
          So 5808 g/L gives 1M
          => 5808 mg/mL gives 1M [g/L=1000mg/1000mL=1mg/mL]
          =>5.808 mg/mL gives 1mM
          => 1 mg/mL gives 1/5.808 mM
          => 10 mg/mL gives 10/5.808 mM=1.72 mM

          Now, so we have 1.72 mM (10mg/ml) of insulin, and let's convert it to 100 uM (micromolar) first.
          So C1=1.72 and C2=100um=0.1mM (we want to keep the unit the same on both sides). Let's say we are making 1mL of 100um insulin. Our V2=1mL
          Following C1xV1=C2xV2
          1.72 mM x V1= 0.1 mM x 1mL
          => V1= 0.1/1.72 mL=0.0581 mL= ~0.06mL=60 uL.
          So 60uL of 10mg/mL in 1mL of solution gives 100uM of insulin.
          So we add 60 uL of 10mg/mL insulin to 940 uL of water (60+940=1000 uL =1mL solution) to get 100 uM of insulin.

          Keep this 1mL stock. You can add 10 uL from it to 10mL of media (conversion 1:1000) to get a 100 nM final concentration. (1:1000=100uM:100nM)
          If you need more than 100 uM insulin stock (V2, which is 1 mL here) you can change the number in the calculation above and get the required amount as well.
          Hope this is helpful.

          Comment

          Working...
          X