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Floor rating and a falling object

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  • Floor rating and a falling object

    Hi all, had a quick search and couldn't find any relevant information. A bit of a complex problem, I have a floor rating of 5kN/m2. If this wasn't covered and a weight fell from a specific height landed I believe if heavy or high enough then that potentially would go above the floor rating? Please correct if I am wrong. Now same circumstance but thick, dense rubber matting was laid down to reduce the impact force, how could that be perceived against the floor rating.

    This is a real world issue I am facing with a building owner telling me that with us dropping weights in a our gym with a 3/4inch high density floor covering that we are going to wreck the floor and the building foundations, although after 2 years no issues have occurred. He cited the buildings by-laws (which are a minimum requirement I guess) and told us we are going above the standards.

    I understand this is complex so i am really only looking for the simplest answer. Thank you for your help.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Grantmac View Post
    Hi all, had a quick search and couldn't find any relevant information. A bit of a complex problem, I have a floor rating of 5kN/m2. If this wasn't covered and a weight fell from a specific height landed I believe if heavy or high enough then that potentially would go above the floor rating? Please correct if I am wrong. Now same circumstance but thick, dense rubber matting was laid down to reduce the impact force, how could that be perceived against the floor rating.

    This is a real world issue I am facing with a building owner telling me that with us dropping weights in a our gym with a 3/4inch high density floor covering that we are going to wreck the floor and the building foundations, although after 2 years no issues have occurred. He cited the buildings by-laws (which are a minimum requirement I guess) and told us we are going above the standards.

    I understand this is complex so i am really only looking for the simplest answer. Thank you for your help.
    I was hoping you'd get some other answers as I don't know how to model or calculate this.

    If both the floor and the weight are rigid, the force is infinite. Of course nothing is "rigid."

    The key is the total amount of "give" in both the floor and the weight, whether the deformation is elastic or inelastic. You would need a model of the deformation details of the "collision."

    However, dense and thick rubber matting would help a lot. It would also deaden noise which might also be the "real" issue.

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