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Understand conversion mg/Nm3 v mg C/Nm3 for solvent emission limits to air

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  • Understand conversion mg/Nm3 v mg C/Nm3 for solvent emission limits to air

    Dear experts,

    Can you help me understand emissions limits for solvent cleaning in accordance with industrial emissions directive.
    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-cont...LEX:32010L0075


    Part 2 specifies a limit of 20 mg C/Nm3 (with a note that reads limit value refers to mass of compounds in mg/Nm3, and not to total carbon)

    Part 4 also states

    Emission limit values relating to volatile organic compounds with specific risk phrases

    1. For emissions of the volatile organic compounds referred to in Article 58 where the mass flow of the sum of the compounds causing the labelling referred to in that Article is greater than, or equal to, 10 g/h, an emission limit value of 2 mg/Nm3 shall be complied with. The emission limit value refers to the mass sum of the individual compounds.

    2. For emissions of halogenated volatile organic compounds which are assigned or need to carry the hazard statements H341 or H351, where the mass flow of the sum of the compounds causing the hazard statements H341 or H351 is greater than, or equal to, 100 g/h, an emission limit value of 20 mg/Nm3 shall be complied with. The emission limit value refers to the mass sum of the individual compounds.


    Our regulator limits are specified as mg/m3. My question is, if I am working with a solvent that falls into the specific risk phrases called out in part 4 above, what limit should I apply in mg/m3 ??

    I look forward to your response.
    Last edited by OC249; 08-11-2020, 06:59 AM.

  • #2
    Since this would be a compliance matter, I think you need to engage professional help familiar with EU regulations. As an American, I have little experience with them. I tried to read through them, and I frankly do not feel I can give reliable advice in interpretting them and complying with their provisions. (In short, I may be more confused than you.)

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    • #3
      Thanks for the response. If you were to ignore all the regulatory context - what is 1 mg/Nm3 in mg/m3?

      Comment


      • #4
        Nm³ is notation for normal cubic meter. It simply means the actual volume of the gas at actual temperature and pressure has been recomputed to the volume the gas would occupy at "normal" temperature and pressure, 273.15 K (0° C) and 101.325 kPa. The Ideal Gas Law is normally assumed unless a better equation of state is available and the gas is known to be non-ideal.

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