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Area of Lot2

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  • Area of Lot2

    Can someone tell me the area of lot2 (in yellow) in feet and acres.
    Click Link below
    https://dlbdlb65.wixsite.com/waldorf...oad/post/_lot2

    thank you
    Don

  • #2
    Originally posted by Don Bern View Post
    Can someone tell me the area of lot2 (in yellow) in feet and acres.
    Click Link below
    https://dlbdlb65.wixsite.com/waldorf...oad/post/_lot2

    thank you
    Don
    We have a traverse calculator I can run it through. When I look at the plat, most of the lines around lot 2 appear to be double dimensioned, one length and bearing with parentheses, a second dimension without. The two dimensions differ by as much as 2 feet and 1 degree, which will change the results. Do you know which is correct?

    Also, the 265.79' lot line along Aspen Cove Drive has no bearing. Can I assume it is the same S 56° 45' 27 E as the 290.49' line preceding it?

    Comment


    • #3
      I ran it through our traverse calculator using the lengths and bearings not in parentheses (since one dimension appears only that way). The traverse does not close to acceptable surveying standards having a residual closure error of 1.43' in a total length of 784.78', a ratio of 0.0018. A closure ratio less than 0.0001 is generally required for urban or high value land, 0.0002 for rural or low value land.
      The area is computed as 30982 ft² ( about 0.71 acre). Please do not place over-reliance on this figure as the traverse does not close to surveying standards, however, I don't think the area error is huge. To lower precision, call it 31000 ft², give or take.
      Last edited by JohnS; 01-25-2021, 01:23 PM.

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      • #4
        Thank you JohnS. Your calculation is close enough for me.
        DonB

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        • #5
          Hello JohnS
          Can you take a look at this calculator and tell me how to use it.
          I tried several times to get it to work with my problem but I was unable to get closure anywhere near correct.
          Maybe a screen shot for me. Or instructions for beginners.
          DonB

          https://www.onlineconversion.com/sha...y_traverse.htm

          Comment


          • #6
            The lengths are pretty straightforward. However, there are some peculiarities with the angles:

            *You can convert degrees-minutes-seconds to decimal degrees or you can separate parts with slashes ddd/mm/ss. It does not recognize ° ' " symbols.

            *A traverse is literally a walk around the boundary, going in one direction CW or counterclockwise. Every line points two ways. Sometimes the direction the surveyor shot disagrees with direction of traverse. You reverse the line by adding or subtracting 180° or by reversing the quadrantal letters N to S or vice versa and E to W or vice versa (always reverse both letters.

            *(The BIG problem) Surveyors use quadrantal angles 0-90° E or W of N or S. Our calculator uses 360° compass bearings. The correction is different for each quadrant.
            NE: use as is
            SE: Subtract the angle from 180° (or 179°59'60")
            SW: Add the angle to 180°
            NW: Subtract the angle from 360° (or 359°59'60")
            On the subtractions, remember 1° = 60', 1' = 60" (a PITA). It would be a lot easier to use if the coder had coded it to accept quadrantal angles.

            For your data starting at "point of beginning" and going CCW, first angle is labeled SW but we are going reverse way, change to NE, then to compass bearing. Applying all the points above, enter length, bearing as
            118.75, 66/00/12
            117.22, 325/11/52
            58.85, 309/47/52
            222.74, 260/46/21
            265.79, 123/14/33

            It will calculate a residual closure vector, and the area (including the extra "residual"). It does not force closure by adjusting lengths or angles.

            Comment


            • #7
              WOW thank you. I knew it was something I didn't understand about entering the data, but I have never heard of quadrantal angles. I really enjoy maps and I like to learn about them. This is a new aspect of charts and maps I'm very happy to know.
              DonB

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